Goals

Owens Corning established its first set of 10-year footprint reduction goals in 2002. Having significantly reduced our environmental footprint by the end of 2010, we established a new set of footprint reduction goals for 2020. These new goals raised the bar on our commitment to sustainability and reflect an increasingly holistic approach that encompasses our environmental footprint, the attributes of our products, and our desire to affect change by partnering with our customers and suppliers to deliver sustainable solutions.

In October of 2015, we announced we had met our greenhouse gas and toxic air emissions goals ahead of schedule. At that time we made a decision to increase our 2020 commitments of 50 percent and 75 percent reductions for these environmental impacts respectively, and incorporated science-based greenhouse gas target-setting methodology into our strategy.

Seven years into our 10-year environmental goals we have now exceeded our goals for primary energy, water and fine particulate. We are on track to meet our goals for greenhouse gas and toxic air emissions. However, we continue to be challenged by our waste-to-landfill goal.

We are proud to additionally report on several additional goals/KPIs which we feel are important to our stakeholders and provide transparency to our initiatives and programs aligned to our materiality matrix.

For more information on our programs and efforts related to our goals, view our annual sustainability report.

SCS Global Services performed the assurance of the Owens Corning 2017 Sustainability Report against the AA1000 Assurance Standard (2008). In addition, SCS Global Services evaluated the Report against the Global Reporting Initiative’s (GRI) Standards for reporting. Specific performance data were assessed utilizing internationally recognized standards including:

  • ISAE 3000 (Revised), Assurance Engagements Other than Audits or Reviews of Historical Financial Information
  • World Resources Institute’s Greenhouse Gas Protocol: A Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard (Revised Edition), March 2004 along with Scope 2 and Scope 3 Guidance
  • ISO 14064-3:2006 Specification with guidance for the validation and verification of GHG assertions.
    1. To view the assurance statement, please see pages 230-232 within Our 2017 Sustainability Report.
    2. Click here for additional information on the economic and social metrics verified through SCS.

2020 Environmental Footprint Goals

2020 Goal 2017 Progress SDG Target Linkage
Primary Energy Reduce primary energy intensity by 20% from the 2010 baseline 26% intensity reduction SDG #7 Affordable and Clean Energy
SDG #8 Decent Work and Economic Growth
SDG #12 Responsible Consumption and Production
SDG #13 Climate Action
Consumed Energy 20% intensity reduction SDG #7 Affordable and Clean Energy
SDG #12 Responsible Consumption and Production
SDG #13 Climate Action
Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduce greenhouse gas emissions intensity by 50% from the 2010 baseline 48% intensity reduction SDG #7 Affordable and Clean Energy
SDG #13 Climate Action
Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) Reduce PM2.5 emissions intensity by 15% from the 2010 baseline 25% intensity reduction SDG #12 Responsible Consumption and Production
SDG #13 Climate Action
Toxic Air Emissions (TAE)

Combination of hexavalent chromium, formaldehyde, manganese, polycyclic aromatic compounds and ammonia emissions

Reduce TAE intensity by 75% by 2020 from the 2010 baseline 61% intensity reduction SDG #12 Responsible Consumption and Production
SDG #13 Climate Action
Waste to Landfill Reduce waste to landfill intensity by 70% from the 2010 baseline 4% intensity reduction SDG #12 Responsible Consumption and Production
Water Consumption Reduce water intensity by 35% from the 2010 baseline 41% intensity reduction SDG #6 Clean Water and Sanitation
SDG #12 Responsible Consumption and Production

Product Sustainability

Priority Goal/KPI 2017 Progress SDG Target Linkage
Implement continuous improvements Our products will be preferred for applications in sustainable projects and we will not be deselected from projects due to product attributes not meeting sustainable program criteria. In 2017, to meet both regulations in Canada and market demand, we finalized the transition to a fire retardant that contains no hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) for our XPS foam insulation in North America. We were first to announce a formaldehyde-free mineral wool product, SAFB, and going forward we will focus on removing formaldehyde from all mineral wool products. SDG #12 Responsible Consumption and Production
SDG #13 Climate Action
Create pipeline of sustainable products, and increase the value through sustainability in the innovation process by 2020 We are committed to evaluating each of our innovation programs for their net sustainability gains or losses vs. existing products, measuring the results through our sustainability mapping tool. By 2020, we have committed that 85% of our new products and 85% of our new applications will have net sustainability gains. 71% of new products and 50% of new applications for our products have shown net sustainability gains. These gains most frequently resulted from product developments that improved our manufacturing footprint, such as lower plant air emissions, lower material consumption, lower energy usage and higher process efficiencies. Another frequent reason for gains in 2017 was moving to new product designs that use fewer materials, give greater end-use durability and result in less energy usage for the end user. SDG #12 Responsible Consumption and Production
SDG #13 Climate Action

Supply Chain Sustainability

Priority Goal/KPI 2017 Progress SDG Target Linkage
Set clear expectations for sustainability progress by our suppliers 100% of suppliers in compliance with our Supplier Code of Conduct annually Owens Corning originally set this goal in 2014 and started reporting in our 2015 sustainability report. In support of this, in 2015, we set clear expectations on meeting the elements of the supplier code of conduct and reviewed this at our annual supplier recognition event in September of the year. The following year, 2016, Owens Corning updated the code to be more comprehensive and 100% of reporting suppliers were in compliance or had their own Code of Conduct that matched elements of ours. In 2017, we had 94% of suppliers reporting compliance with the supplier code of conduct based on the annual survey. Those that could not say they were in compliance are listed as high risk and follow-up management is in place. SDG #8 Decent Work and Economic Growth
SDG #12 Responsible Consumption and Production
Use leading-edge sourcing practices Through our supplier segmentation process, implemented for the top 87% spend, we have an active management process in place to evaluate, segment, and engage suppliers. As an input to the segmentation companies were asked to provide an annual self-assessment via a survey. The analytics drawn from our survey results help identify risks, best practices, and opportunities across our supply base. In 2017, we advanced our understanding of the analytics and standardized the way we create, communicate, and execute strategies between key suppliers and our commodity leaders. The segmentation analysis is used by commodity leaders to prioritize their efforts of engagement and active management of suppliers. SDG #8 Decent Work and Economic Growth
SDG #12 Responsible Consumption and Production
Measure and disclose performance

1465 suppliers were asked to complete a self-assessment survey in 2017, up from 993 in 2016. Of those 328 were returned for a response rate of 23%, down from 26% last year but up in actual responses by 68. 94% responding meet the terms of our supplier code of conduct.

69% have environmental goals, up from 66% in 2016 and 74% of the manufacturers reporting had some type of environmental goals.

Approximately 87% of suppliers have safety goals and of the manufacturers reporting, more than 92% have safety goals in place.

More than 79% of all suppliers have policies prohibiting forced or child labor.

23 new audits were conducted in 2017.

100% of new suppliers are screened for any, global, governmental sanctions using the Thompson Reuters World Check system.

SDG #8 Decent Work and Economic Growth
SDG #12 Responsible Consumption and Production
Expand our training on sustainability to meet the needs of our global sourcing organization 100% of our global sourcing organization will be trained on sustainability through OC Sourcing Way, developed in 2015, and will be required to recertify annually thereafter on the practices and expectations by 2018. In 2015, we created a playbook called the OC Sourcing Way, that standardizes the way we create, communicate and execute commodity strategies. All global commodity leaders received a 2 – 3-day training which included competitive analytics. In 2016 other functional areas such as downstream supply chain, quality, and R&D were trained. The following year, in 2017, Owens Corning completed phase 2 of The OC Sourcing Way along with updates to phase 1, which will be rolled out to all employees in global sourcing in calendar year 2018. Phase 2 includes implementation of the strategy and supplier management. Sustainability practices have been added to the strategy development chapter and to the supplier management section. Each of the category leaders will be provided in-depth training on key sustainability categories as part of the roll-out. Once rolled out, each global sourcing member will be recertified and education will continue either through online training or classroom. SDG #8 Decent Work and Economic Growth
SDG #12 Responsible Consumption and Production
Enhance our transportation efficiency Convert 12% of transportation miles to natural gas or use alternative fuel savings methods by the year 2020. Owens Corning reported the first wave of fuel-switching to natural gas from diesel fuel in 2015, Owens Corning carriers fueled by natural gas moved product 15 million miles, representing 10% of our total road miles. Of our total miles transported in 2016, 11% were moved using natural gas, a 1% increase over 2015. We increased miles moved via alternative means (intermodal, boxcar) to 21% in 2016, up from 19% in 2015. No new fuel conversions were made in 2017 and, due to demand and market conditions, we were unable to convert to alternative savings, such as intermodal, to make progress on this goal in 2017. We are reviewing options for how to make better progress. SDG #11 Sustainable Cities and Communities
SDG #12 Responsible Consumption and Production
SDG #13 Climate Action

Building Science

Priority Goal/KPI 2017 Progress SDG Target Linkage
Building Science has been a key element in driving our product sustainability. Through sustained partnerships with customers, specifiers, architects, and builders, we hope to drive net-zero energy building capabilities, thereby achieving no net carbon releases. We also aim to expand our building science expertise to educate the building industry, engineers, contractors, and homeowners on safe and efficient building materials. Increase the number of Owens Corning supported net-zero ready buildings year-over-year vs. 2015 baseline of 35. Owens Corning is proud to state that in 2017 our building science strategies have directly influenced and supported the construction of more than 375 NZE ready homes in 2017, building upon the 40 reported in 2016 and the baseline of 35 in 2015. SDG #7 Affordable and Clean Energy
SDG #9 Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
SDG #13 Climate Action

Safety

Priority Goal/KPI 2017 Progress SDG Target Linkage
We are committed to our company value of Living Safely – both at work and at home. While we are committed to eliminating all injuries (goal of 0), our interim goal is to make progress on our march to zero by demonstrating a year over year reduction in the ratio of injuries per employee hours worked. We measure this using a recordable injury rate (RIR). We have moved to using RIR to demonstrate our progress in safety since this ratio allows us to accurately compare year-over-year progress even when there is a significant year-over-year variation in the number of hours our employees work. This goal is consistent with the Owens Corning core value of Living Safely.

In 2017, Owens Corning reported an RIR of 0.50, which was a slight improvement over 0.51 that was reported in 2016 and 0.52 reported in 2015. This modest reduction in RIR was achieved despite the negative impact caused by the acquisition of two companies that have historically had much higher RIR rates than Owens Corning. By integrating the Owens Corning safety process at the newly acquired locations, RIR performance at these sites has improved rapidly. The actual number of employees injured increased to 97 in 2017 as compared to 92 and 84 in 2016 and 2015 respectively.

2018 KPI: We have committed to a reduction of RIR lower than in 0.50 in 2018.

SDG #3 Good Health and Well-being

Employee Development

Priority Goal/KPI 2017 Progress SDG Target Linkage
We are committed to our employee’s development, and are committed to lifelong learning to help them reach their full potential. For 2017, we committed to 13 hours of training per employee beyond basic compliance training.

In 2015 we set our first public goal on employee training beyond basic compliance at 13 hours and achieved 30 hours and we continued to surpass the goal in 2016 and 2017 with 18 and 17 hours respectfully. As we transitioned to a new talent management system in 2016 we also transitioned the method for tracking against the goal. The trend of lower hours over time is due to the transition into the new talent management system as well as the expansion of the number of employees added to the system from our growth strategy.

2018 KPI: We have committed to 18 hours of training per employee beyond basic compliance training.

SDG #4 Quality Education
SDG #5 Gender Equality
SDG #8 Decent Work and Economic Growth

Community Impact

Priority Goal/KPI 2017 Progress Social/Environmental Benefit KPI
(SDG Target Linkage)
Social/Environmental Benefit KPI Progress
Safe and Efficient Housing - Advancing Safe & Efficient Housing in Our Communities Increase customer satisfaction and our Net Promoter Score (NPS) through 2022. We collected feedback from 1,010 Insulation and Roofing customers and 543 contractors, representing a sample of our distinct customer types and locations. The survey allows us to measure overall satisfaction and the Net Promoter Score (NPS) as well as to go into more detail across customer touch points to help drive specific improvements. The NPS score was 47 for building materials customers and 66 for contractors in North America, based on an index ranging from -100 to 100. Increase the number of people benefiting from access to safe and efficient housing in our communities through 2022.
SDG #11 - Sustainable Cities and Communities
Owens Corning understands that for a variety of reasons some members of our communities find themselves unable to obtain safe and efficient housing and shelter. As a leading global producer of residential and commercial building materials we have the opportunity and expertise to aid in the effort to provide safe and efficient housing and shelter for those who are unable to obtain housing through traditional methods. Developing cost-effective housing solutions, coupled with our philanthropic activities, we are ensuring that as a company we are enhancing access to housing and shelter for those members of our communities. Our philanthropic focus on housing and shelter aligns with each of our three identified business drivers. For example, in partnership with Habitat for Humanity, Owens Corning can donate building materials, provide financial support through the OC Foundation, and leverage employee volunteerism to provide safe and energy efficient housing. Owens Corning has also been able to engage its network of roofing contractors to benefit those in need. In support of a company growth initiative to increase the use of glass fiber reinforcement of concrete, the Owens Corning Foundation has entered a partnership agreement with the Concrete Preservation Institute. Key Charitable Partners: World Vision (Global), Habitat for Humanity China (China), Concrete Preservation Institute (U.S.), Habitat for Humanity International (U.S.) The Gary Sinise Foundation (U.S.)
Good Health & Well-being - Foster and Promote Health in Our Communities Increase employee engagement and connection to company. 100% of our facilities engaged by 2022 through community projects. In 2017, the company surveyed approximately 1,000 employees and found that 92.5% said that it is meaningful to them that Owens Corning provides volunteer opportunities in their community. Of more than 700 volunteers surveyed after company sponsored community events, 100% said that they would volunteer again. In 2017, our people gave 25,591 hours of volunteerism at company sponsored community events. That was up from 16,734 hours in 2016, a 53% increase. In 2017: 82% of our approximately 100 operations worldwide were engaged in local community projects, up from 72% in 2016 and 66% in 2015. Increase the number of people benefiting from access to basic health and wellness in our communities through 2022.
SDG #3 - Good Health and Well-being
SDG #6 - Clean Water and Sanitation
In our most challenged communities, providing the less fortunate with access to basic health and wellness aligns with each of our three identified business drivers by connecting us with the community, further improving our reputation locally, regionally, and globally and instilling a sense of pride in our workforce. This focus also allows us to go into new communities where our company is expanding, and make immediate positive impact. For example, in India, in the villages near our plants, we work to provide doctor visits, nutrition, clean water, sanitation systems, and healthy activities for children in need. Our employees are highly engaged as volunteers and in some cases, the support is benefiting the children of our own migrant workforce. Across the globe, efforts to improve health reached not only our communities in India, but also Mexico, France, Italy, the United States and beyond. Key Charitable Partners: Rise Against Hunger (Global), World Vision (Global), Habitat for Humanity India (India), Mumbai Mobile Creches (India), United Way Mumbai (India), French Red Cross (France), Cantine Savoyarde Solidarite (France), Lega del filo d’oro (Italy), Escuela Hogar Perpetuo Socorro (Mexico), Mexican Red Cross (Mexico), Cherry Street Mission (U.S.), Pack Shack (U.S.)
Educational Opportunity - Drive Access to Education in Our Communities Increase employee engagement and connection to company. 100% of our facilities engaged by 2022 through community projects. In 2017, the company surveyed approximately 1,000 employees and found that 92.5% said that it is meaningful to them that Owens Corning provides volunteer opportunities in their community. Of more than 700 volunteers surveyed after company sponsored community events, 100% said that they would volunteer again. In 2017, our people gave 25,591 hours of volunteerism at company sponsored community events. That was up from 16,734 hours in 2016, a 53% increase. In 2017: 82% of our approximately 100 operations worldwide were engaged in local community projects, up from 72% in 2016 and 66% in 2015.

Increase the number of people benefiting from promoting educational opportunities in our communities through 2022

SDG #4: Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning

In our most challenged communities, providing the less fortunate with access to basic educational opportunity aligns with each of our 3 identified business drivers by connecting us w/the community, further improving our reputation and instilling workforce pride. This also allows us enter new communities and make a positive impact. Nearly all this activity is guided by the interest and efforts of our employee volunteers. In India, we provide non-formal educational opportunities, computers for schools that had no previous access, and scholarships for students who excel, encouraging families to keep them in school, particularly girls. We also build restrooms for schools where they did not previously exist allowing girls to stay in school at the onset of puberty. In Taloja, India we have partnered with local organizations to provide skilled job training to unemployed young men and women while in Powai we continue to support Mumbai Mobile Creches, giving the very young children of migrant construction workers exposure to early learning they would otherwise lack. Near Tlaxcala, Mexico we are in the process of building a new school for deaf children while in China we continue to provide access to computers to migrant schools near our plants in a growing number of communities. In our world headquarters town of Toledo, Ohio we have partnered with the Cherry Street Mission Life Revitalization Center to provide skilled job training to the unemployed and homeless and our team regularly volunteers at inner city schools to help children in math, reading, and even in robotics competitions. Finally, the Owens Corning Foundation provides educational support in the form of college scholarships based on need and merit for the children of company employees and matches employee donations to educational institutions. Key Charitable Partners NetSpring Green IT (China) Mexican Red Cross (Mexico) United Way Mumbai (India) Mumbai Mobile Creches (India) Cherry Street Mission (U.S) Concrete Preservation Institute (U.S) Toledo Public Schools (U.S).